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I am a writer, editor, reviewer and dance teacher based in Perth, Western Australia.

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The first novel of my trilogy, The Talismans, is available as e-books from Smashwords, Amazon and other online sellers. I do have paperbacks of The Dagger of Dresnia at the low price of $AU25 including postage within Australia. I also have a short story, 'La Belle Dame', in print - see Mythic Resonance below. Book two of the trilogy, The Cloak of Challiver, will be available again shortly. The best way to contact me is via Facebook!

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The first two books of The Talismans trilogy were published by Satalyte Publications, which, sadly, has gone out of business. I hope to see my books back on Amazon under a new publisher in the near future.

The Dagger of Dresnia

The Dagger of Dresnia
Want a copy? Contact me at satimafn(at)gmail.com

The Cloak of Challiver

The Cloak of Challiver
Available again as an ebook soon!

Mythic Resonance

Buy Mythic Resonance

Mythic Resonance is an excellent anthology that includes my short story 'La Belle Dame', together with great stories from Alan Baxter, Donna Maree Hanson, Sue Burstynski, Nike Sulway and nine more fantastic authors! Just $US3.99 from Amazon. Got a Kindle? Check out Mythic Resonance.

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Sunday, 8 November 2009

Once I thought...

Over on my writing and editing blog, I’ve just put up a post about how one becomes an editor. I called it “Once I thought I’d like to be an editor”. This sounded vaguely familiar and I soon realised why. When I was a little girl of five years old or so, my father taught me a silly little song that went like this:

Once I thought I'd like to be a cricketer
So down to the park I took a little stroll
To see a cricket match, the first one in my natch
To see how I could bowl.
One young man, he knew the way to bat a bit
He sent the ball so wonderfully high
Right up in the air, you could see it there
It looked just like a stick into the sky!
I stood and watched it, right above my head
‘Come away from under it,’ everybody said
But I knew how to catch a ball, about it I had read
In a little penny book I’d bought.
My eyes were shut and my mouth was open wide
I felt a sort of earthquake; I thought I should have died!
They never got the ball back from out of my inside…
Well caught! Howzat!

Like the old Yorkshire song On Ilkley Moor b'at’at, which I can also still sing right through, this song was part of my childhood. Neither song is much heard today, and more’s the pity, because they are good fun and easy to sing. What favourite old songs can you remember from your early years?

11 comments:

Jo said...

Daisy, Daisy give me your answer do.

You know the rest.

Also Frère Jaques. My aunt had a French boyfriend during the war and I would sit on his knee and he and I would sing it together.

Satima Flavell said...

My sisters taught me Frère Jaques, too. I liked the Sonnez les matines part best:-)

My eldest sister had a boyfriend who was half-French, half-German (And this during WWII - poor guy!) who read me stories. He even copied out one that was in German into French and Enlish versions for me, so I could read the tale in all three languages. He even illustrated them for me. The story was about a bear, very like Rupert, who is still a comic-strip character in Germany, I think. The funny thing is that when I went to German classes as an adult, I found I knew how to conjugate German verbs. The things you learn earliest stay with you, I guess:-)

Imagine me said...

I loved songs that circled around like On Ilkley Moor b'at'at and There's a Hole in the Bucket and rounds and silly songs like If Mares Eat Oats when I was a child. I used to sing them to my kids, neither of whom wanted to take part but loved listening to them.

Satima Flavell said...

I heard a sad thing a few months back - that children who are preschoolers now don't know any nursery rhymes! And, it seems, their knowledge of Christamas songs is largely limited to the secular ones such as Rudolf and White Christmas. What a shame to have all those beaut old songs fall away. I think they still learn There's a Hole in the Bucket at school because I've heard kids singing it, so perhaps all is not lost...:-)

Jo said...

Well you can't teach carols in school any more, its religion so you mustn't do it!!!

Re There's a hole in my bucket, Matt and I went to see Harry Belafonte some years ago. The show was held in the local arena with a stage set up in the middle. He and a guest were singing this song and laughing so much they couldn't remember where they'd got to, I called out the next line (we were close to the stage) and he asked me how I knew, I said I had seen him sing it before - he picked up on my English accent and came back with a very good sound saying "aren't you a little tired of it by now". It was pretty funny.

Mare's Eat Oats was one of my favourites as a kid, too.

Satima Flavell said...

I've heard others say how entertaining Belafonte is in person, although when he was younger he used to get people's backs up with his contant clinging off at the British and at colonialism. I can understand West Indian people feeling angry but I don't think that kind of talk has any place in entertainment.

Yeah, it's a pity Christmas Carols are being sacrficed to political correctness:-(

bao bao said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Tracey said...

My Dad used to sing this to us all too. He was born in 1911 (New Zealand) - all five of us kids still remember it!

Satima Flavell said...

That's interesting, Tracey. I've never heard it sung here in Oz. I wonder if it's still known in EnZed?

Hilary Forbes said...

My Mum just quoted that cricketer song to me today, and told me she'd learned it from her Mum who used to say it to her as a child. Mum is 87 now! It's a slightly different version, but I guess there were probably quite a few different versions maybe. I just wondered if it was a well known song and google searched it and found your blog :)

Satima Flavell said...

Yes, it's an old song - possibly goes back to the 1920s or so, and I would imagine there could be several different versions about. My older sisters used to sing it and I am almost into my 8th decade!

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